Geometric Facets Organizer 50% Off This Week Only

The Facets Organizer is the perfect geometric catchall for all your little knick knacks.
It’s also the perfect holder for your favorite succulent.
Using super bulky yarn, the organizer works up fast and stands on its own.
The pattern includes a chart.

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Facets Organizer ~ Geometric Catch All

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Great Succulent Holder!

All the above links will send you to Craftsy.com where the discounted price is already applied.

If you prefer Etsy or Ravelry, click the links below and use promo code: FACETS50 to receive 50% off the pattern shown.

Sale good through Sunday, October 22nd, 2017 midnight Pacific time.

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There’s Still Time To Make A Cobweb Shawl Before Halloween

COBWEB

Free Pattern and Video

The perfect accessory for your spooky costume this year.
Download the free pattern and watch the free video tutorial here..

Paint Your Own Ceramic Yarn Bowl

 

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Newbie Newsday ~ How To Get Rid Of Those Annoying Gaps In Your Work

Scroll to the bottom of the post to watch a video on this technique.

If you’ve ever worked any project in any stitch other than single crochet, you’ll know what gaps I’m talking about.

When you start each new row of a crochet project, you will perform a “turning chain”.

For example, if your project is in double crochet, the normal turning chain will be a chain 3. You make this turning chain so your row will have the proper starting height it needs to keep the entire row even. If you leave it out and just start double crocheting, your first stitch will be squashed down and not look the same as the rest.

However, that chain 3 isn’t actually worked into the first stitch, or any stitch for that matter. Instead, it sits just to the right of your first stitch. Then as normal crochet goes, you make your first double crochet in the stitch after (the 2nd stitch of the row) and you end up with this gap that results from the distance of the chain 3 to your first stitch.

My finger on the left is in one of these gaps, you can also see other gaps on the right of the work and two rows above my finger..

My finger on the left is in one of these gaps, you can also see other gaps on the right of the work and two rows above my finger.

One way some people eliminate this gap is to not count the chain 3 as your first stitch. and then go ahead and make the chain 3

They will CH 3 and double crochet in the first stitch of the row. But again, the result is not great. Now you get a bump every other row from the chain 3 being forced to stick out from the stitch that was made in the first stitch space.

You can see how the ends are very wavy looking. That is the chain 3 being forced out and creating a bump.

You can see how the ends are very wavy looking. That is the chain 3 being forced out and creating a bump.

There is a fix for both of these problems. This technique can be substituted whenever you want and for any stitch you want. The result will be a nice flat edge project with no gaps.

This technique can be substituted whenever you want and for any stitch you want (above a single crochet). The result will be a nice flat edge project with no gaps.

Look at my sides, no gaps and no waves!

Look at my sides, no gaps and no waves!

This technique is super simple and is the same for any stitch you use it for.

All you will simply do instead of making your normal turning chain, is make a super extended single chain. Let me show you.

Your first step in this technique is to take the loop on your hook and pull it out to the height of the stitch you are making. Don’t worry if it’s not the exact same height, somewhere in the ballpark will be good enough.

But, it is better to make it a little shorter than taller than the stitch you are making. This will keep it more hidden and less likely to stick out.

Pull the chain out for the normal height of whatever stitch you are working. This project is using double crochets.

Pull the chain out for the normal height of whatever stitch you are working. This project is using double crochets.

Next, secure this long loop by making a chain stitch at the top.

Just yarn over and pull through the loop to make your chain as usual.

Just yarn over and pull through the loop to make your chain as usual.

Now you have a skinny “turning chain” that will sit right next to the double crochet you will make in the first stitch.

You will make your first double crochet (or whatever stitch you are working) in the first stitch. No skipping.

You will make your first double crochet (or whatever stitch you are working) in the first stitch. No skipping.

Whether the project says that the turning chain counts as a stitch or not, when using this technique, you will make the skinny turning chain and a stitch in the first stitch you come to. That means you don’t count the skinny turning chain as a stitch. In other words, it will be ignored when counting stitches.

Here is the finished skinny turning chain and first double crochet shown together.

Here is the finished skinny turning chain and first double crochet shown together.

Now your project will have nice edges and no gaps!

Check out the video to see the technique in action.

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National Craft Month - Crafts

Free Pocket Super Scarf Pattern and Video Tutorial

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New year, new free pattern.

Leggings and workout pants are all the rage right now. Only problem, they have tiny or no pockets.

Insert the pocket super scarf. Its generous pockets will hold keys, phone, cards and keep your hands warm with room to spare.

Best of all, it’s a free pattern!

Download the pattern and watch the free video tutorial here.

Lefties click here.

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Daily Deals

Messy Bun Beanie Free Pattern Workshop

messy bun beanie tutorial free pattern

It’s crazy how many people have asked me for a messy bun beanie tutorial in the last month.

I’ve whipped one up and it’s all ready to go. Using bulky weight yarn, this beanie took me under 2 hours from start to finish.

Any level of crocheter can work this beanie up in an evening.

Download the pattern and watch the free video tutorial here.

Lefties click here.

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Help Me Pick What’s Next

My 1st Pair!

My 1st Pair!

I finally finished my first pair of socks and am ready for even more. The class I took: My First Socks, was absolutely fantastic for learning how to knit a basic pair of socks. The instructions were very clear and showed common pitfalls and why things were done. The first pair is in worsted weight yarn so you can see all the stitches you are making. The class also included a pattern for a sock weight yarn pair that I’m working on next.

Now that I’ve finished these, I want to learn a new technique, but I can’t decide which one. So, I’m asking you guys to help me out by voting. What do you think I should learn next? Or what would you like to hear about? If you’ve ever wanted to knit socks, what would you want to learn?

My choices are below. I pay for all these classes myself, so consider that as well when choosing for me. If you happen to try one of these classes, these links will give me a little bit a moola that I’ll use to help me pay for my classes, so be sure to sign up if you are interested.

I did sign up for the class below already. It is a free knit along and has the same instructor from my first socks class. She was a great teacher and I think this class will be just as fabulous.

Knit-Along 2016: SocksFREE!!

Let instructor Lucy Neatby guide you to sock-cess! In this one-of-a-kind knit-along, you’ll receive two new lessons and a new design each month, so you can knit your way through three exciting knitted sock patterns. Start with the smocked Guernsey sock, as you learn how to work from cuff down, create a sturdy slip-stitch heel and work a toe chimney. Then, move on to the toe-up Serpentine sock, where you’ll knit beautiful cable patterning, the garter short row heel and even a nifty I-cord cuff. Want a project with a little more color? You’ll complete your knit-along with the Windowpane sock, as Lucy teaches you how to work a double-thick cuff, a two-color slip-stitch leg and the swirly star toe.

 

So here are the choices:

Knit Original Cuff-Down Socks – $39.99

Master the traditional method of knitting socks with expert knitter and author Donna Druchunas. Donna guides you through sock fitting, heel shaping and stitch pattern choices. You’ll learn to use three different needle types (double-pointed needles, two circular needles or the magic loop). Even super-experienced sock knitters will discover inspired variations on heels and toes, stitches, yarns, needles and colors. Whether you customize the universal pattern, or tackle one of Donna’s three bonus sock designs, you will love the results.

Knit Original Toe-Up Socks – $39.99

Embrace the time-tested method of toe-up knitting! Join popular instructor Donna Druchunas, and learn how to create your own seamless sock design by mixing and matching different features. Start class by learning about the anatomy of a sock before moving on to the shaping and stitch patterns you can use. For toes, Donna will lay out the steps to the moccasin toe, the wedge toe and the short row toe. When you move on, you’ll discover how to create afterthought heels, gusset heels and short row heels. Want to ensure sock success before you start? Donna will guide you through taking accurate measurements and planning your sock using an included worksheet. Plus, you’ll learn great tips and tricks for polished finishing and receive three free patterns included with class!

Knit Sock Workshop – $39.99

Designer and author Donna Druchunas walks you through knitting socks from the ground up. From casting on to binding off, Donna details simple steps to make intricate sock patterns easy and enjoyable. Once you’ve worn handmade socks, your feet won’t be satisfied with anything else. Donna introduces you to knitting from the toe up so you can try on the sock as you knit and adjust the height of the cuff. You will discover two techniques for starting a sock, three different heel techniques, and usefuls tips and tricks like the figure-8 cast-on and stretchy bind-off. Learn to read charts and use double-pointed or circular needles to create lace and stranded colorwork in the round.

Essential Techniques for Sock Knitting – $29.99

Conquer sock knitting essentials that ensure success! Join designer Ann Budd and learn little details that make things easier at every step. During class, you’ll see how to knit identical socks toe-up and cuff-down, and find out how to troubleshoot any tricky situations that pop up along the way. Ann will begin by demonstrating how to take accurate measurements before helping you conquer popular sock cast-ons and bind-offs. For variety, you’ll discover new heel and toe styles, and Ann will share methods for shaping. With these skills you can accommodate for the unique features of any feet! Plus, throughout class you’ll learn the classic techniques that lead to great socks, from picking up stitches to grafting.

I’ll be making my choice once I finish the sock weight pair I’m making, so hopefully within a week or so. I’ll let you know how it goes.

 

Get Ready For Winter 2014 With 50% off New Pattern

Though it’s technically spring, it’s still cold in many places. And since I told everyone I was dropping everything to make something from this yarn, I can’t wait until next winter to put it up. So here it is, the pattern I made from the yarn that has actual silver in it.

Women's Textable Gloves

Women’s Textable Gloves

These ribbed gloves use the super cool Silver Spun yarn from LanaMundi. Not only do they keep your fingers toasty, but the yarn has actual silver spun right in which makes it possible to use your touchscreen devices without having to remove them. You can check out the video review below to see them in action on my phone.

The actual pattern will be great with any lightweight yarn, plus you can just add some conductive thread to the finger pads of the gloves and they will work just as well as the Silver Spun.

I’ve included three sizes to fit most women’s hands. Plus if you get the pattern now, you can get 50% off!

Promo Code

Use promo code: text50 at checkout to receive the discount.*

Click here to go purchase the pattern now.

*Offer good until Sunday, April 14th, 2014 midnight Pacific time.

Video Review

Addi Swing Crochet Hooks – Ergonomic or Uneconomical?

I had bought an Addi Swing crochet hook in a size 3mm over a year ago. I bought it because it claimed it was ergonomic and would help with hand fatigue.

I finally got around to trying it out and made a video review of what I thought.

I unfortunately didn’t find the high price tag (over $13 US for one hook) translating into less pain. More like an awkwardly shaped handle that I couldn’t hold just right.

I’ve had this video review of my Addi Swing Crochet Hook up for almost a week now and find that many people share my sentiment — they just aren’t that comfortable to hold. Whether a knife or pencil grip, the ergonomic handle forces you to hold it a certain way, which for some reason doesn’t point my hook in the correct way to crochet.

Do any of you have an Addi? What do you think of it? Let us know below. 

Ever Wonder How Bright These Are?

A picture sometimes just doesn't cut it.

A picture sometimes just doesn’t tell you everything you need to know.

I purchased one of these Crochet Lites a couple of years back and just made a little video about it to share with you. I bought the hook out of shear curiosity as to how well it would work and how bright it would actually be.

I have found it to be useful in certain situations (which I talk about in the video), I have found it to be even more useful in other situations. I am working on a separate post right now that will show my next favorite way to use the hook. It will be up in the next day or two, so stay tuned.

Do you have a Crochet Lite? How do you like it? What do you use it for?