Knit and Crochet Ever After
Tutorials

How To Get Rid Of Those Annoying Gaps In Your Work ~ Revisiting an oldie but goodie.

This is one of my favorite and easiest crochet tips to make your project look instantly better.

Scroll to the bottom of the post to watch a video on this technique.

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This tutorial is going to show you how to avoid those annoying gaps in the sides of your crochet project.

If you’ve ever worked on any project in any stitch other than single crochet, you’ll know what gaps I’m talking about.

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Usually, when you start each new row of a crochet project, you will perform a “turning chain”.

For example, if your project is in double crochet, the normal turning chain will be a chain 3. You make this turning chain so your row will have the proper starting height it needs to keep the entire row even. If you leave it out and just start double crocheting, your first stitch will be squashed down and not look the same as the rest.

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However, that chain 3 isn’t actually worked into the first stitch, or any stitch for that matter. Instead, it sits just to the right of your first stitch. Then as normal crochet goes, you make your first double crochet in the stitch after (the 2nd stitch of the row) and you end up with this gap that results from the distance of the chain 3 to your first stitch.

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My finger on the left is in one of these gaps, you can also see other gaps on the right of the work and two rows above my finger..
My finger on the left is in one of these gaps, you can also see other gaps on the right of the work and two rows above my finger.
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One way some people eliminate this gap is to not count the chain 3 as your first stitch. and then make a double crochet in the first stitch.

But again, the result is not great. Now you get a bump every other row from the chain 3 being forced to stick out from the stitch that was made in the first stitch space.

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You can see how the ends are very wavy looking. That is the chain 3 being forced out and creating a bump.
You can see how the ends look very wavy. That is the chain 3 being forced out and creating a bump.
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There is a fix for both of these problems. It is my favorite technique and I use it all the time. This technique can be substituted whenever you want and for any stitch you want (above a single crochet). The result will be a nice flat edge with no gaps.

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Look at my sides, no gaps and no waves!
Look at my sides, no gaps and no waves!
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This technique is super simple and is the same for any stitch you use it for.

All you will simply do instead of making your normal turning chain, is make a super extended single chain. See the photos below.

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Your first step in this technique is to take the loop on your hook and pull it out to the height of the stitch you are making. Don’t worry if it’s not the exact same height, somewhere in the ballpark will be good enough.

But, it is better to make it a little shorter than taller than the stitch you are making. This will keep it more hidden and less likely to stick out.

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Pull the chain out for the normal height of whatever stitch you are working. This project is using double crochets.
Pull the chain out for the normal height of whatever stitch you are working. This project is using double crochets.
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Next, secure this long loop by making a chain stitch at the top.

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Just yarn over and pull through the loop to make your chain as usual.
Just yarn over and pull through the loop to make your chain as usual.
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Now you have a skinny “tall chain” that will sit right next to the double crochet you will make in the first stitch.

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You will make your first double crochet (or whatever stitch you are working) in the first stitch. No skipping.
You will make your first double crochet (or whatever stitch you are working) in the first stitch. No skipping.
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Whether the project says that the turning chain counts as a stitch or not, when using this technique, you will make the skinny turning chain and a stitch in the first stitch you come to. That means you don’t count the skinny turning chain as a stitch. In other words, it will be ignored when counting stitches.

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Here is the finished skinny turning chain and first double crochet shown together.
Here is the finished skinny turning chain and first double crochet shown together.
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You will use this whenever you want nice straight edges. You’ll see this referred to as a “tall chain” in many of my patterns.

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Pin it to remember for later!
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Check out the video to see the technique in action.

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